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Follow Along Online

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Being brave enough to try and fail; start and start again; drag yourself off the floor when you’re down.... whew. That’s no joke. . But after we’ve stood in/owned/sat with any pain, frustration or disappointment, we get to make a choice —to either stay with the pain a little longer and/or start asking how we can grow and stretch. . “Our failings can be the foundation for our ongoing spiritual growth. Those who have fallen, failed, or “gone down” are the only ones who understand “up.” We grow spiritually more by doing it wrong than by doing it right.” -Inside cover of Richard Rohr’s book Falling Upward. . If you haven’t read this one, I can’t recommend it enough. @cacradicalgrace . #fallingupward #spiritualgrowth #failingforward #christianmysticism #richardrohr

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Inviting change, establising boudries, transformation, and letting go of old patterns are hard. . Be gentle with yourself in the process. . Baby steps. . ❤️ Natalie

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Love, Natalie . . . . #compassion #selfcare #reachout #youareworthy #areasonableway

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After that last post, I’ve gotten some DMs about whether we earn worth. It seems some are thinking, “We totally have to earn it. I work hard at doing things right. People need to try harder, do better.” . Others wouldn’t dare suggest that someone else isn’t giving it their all, but in an instant would treat themselves with the same lack of compassion. “Once I do/accomplish/quit..., I’ll be worthy of... I need to do better, try harder.” . If worth WERE a thing we could earn, what exactly must one do to earn it? What must one do to be worthy of our respect? And in order to be worthy of self-love and self-respect, what do we require of ourselves? . How ‘bout a list: . 1) Being a good parent? What if you don’t have kids, a child dies, you just aren’t into children? . 2) Work ethic? What if you’re laid off, retired, disabled, the sole parent of babies with no one to care for them? . 3) Being fit? What if you’re in an accident? If you’re sick? . 4) Youth or beauty. What about aging? . 5) Intellect or creativity? What about dementia? If you take a “day job” to provide for your family? If you’re working/raising kids and there’s no time to read or create? . 6) A big house, a nice car, clothes, a solid net worth? What if you just don’t make that kind of money, the company goes bankrupt or it all burns to the ground? . 7) Being endlessly generous, giving up yourself for others’ needs, being a martyr? What if you must set boundaries, leave a relationship, or focus on yourself to find joy and health? . How many things on the list must one have or do well? 2 things, or 4? Do we have to do 1 and 3 in particular or are 6 and 7 enough? . Perhaps we find value in all of them? . Okay. . Maybe they bring us joy, health, pleasure, pride and purpose, respect from our community, the approval of friends. . Okay. . But these things are impermanent and ever-changing. Therefore, they can’t be tied to our worth. And without them, whether we’ve lost them or never had them, whether we can’t or don’t understand how to get them, we’re still worthy of love. Because the value of a human life is inherent. You are worthy simply because you are. . Love, Natalie